Monday, January 16, 2017

Study: Now are 8 men richer than half of the world population

By David Chutlashvili

Oxfam’s report, ‘An economy for the 99 percent’, shows that the gap between rich and poor is far greater than had been feared. It details how big business and the super-rich are fuelling the inequality crisis by dodging taxes, driving down wages and using their power to influence politics. It calls for a fundamental change in the way we manage our economies so that they work for all people, and not just a fortunate few. 

Eight men own the same wealth as the 3.6 billion people who make up the poorest half of humanity, according to a new report published by Oxfam today to mark the annual meeting of political and business leaders in Davos.

Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director of Oxfam International, said: 

“It is obscene for so much wealth to be held in the hands of so few when 1 in 10 people survive on less than $2 a day.  Inequality is trapping hundreds of millions in poverty; it is fracturing our societies and undermining democracy. Across the world, people are being left behind. Their wages are stagnating yet corporate bosses take home million dollar bonuses; their health and education services are cut while corporations and the super-rich dodge their taxes; their voices are ignored as governments sing to the tune of big business and a wealthy elite.” 

"Our broken economies are funnelling wealth to a rich elite at the expense of the poorest in society, the majority of whom are women. The richest are accumulating wealth at such an astonishing rate that the world could see its first trillionaire in just 25 years.  To put this figure in perspective – you would need to spend $1 million every day for 2738 years to spend $1 trillion. Public anger with inequality is already creating political shockwaves across the globe. Inequality has been cited as a significant factor in the election of Donald Trump in the US, the election of President Duterte in the Philippines, and Brexit in the UK. Seven out of 10 people live in a country that has seen a rise in inequality in the last 30 years.  Between 1988 and 2011 the incomes of the poorest 10 percent increased by just $65 per person, while the incomes of the richest 1 percent grew by $11,800 per person – 182 times as much,Oxfam reports.

Byanyima said: 

“The millions of people who have been left behind by our broken economies need solutions, not scapegoats. That is why Oxfam is setting out a new common sense approach to managing our economies so that they work for the majority and not just the fortunate few.”


“Governments are not helpless in the face of technological change and market forces.  If politicians stop obsessing with GDP, and focus on delivering for all their citizens and not just a wealthy few, a better future is possible for everyone.”

Probably we will soon live in a cruel world, where everything is ruled by a gigantic company, like Weyland-Yutani Corporation. This corporation will have secret services, soldiers, spaceships, and we will work for miserable cents like Fiorina 161 prisoners. Alien 3 will be our horrible reality soon. This tragic future awaits us when we will believe in God and will not do anything against the growing social inequality.

The world’s 8 richest people are, in order of net worth:

1. Bill Gates: America founder of Microsoft (net worth $75 billion)

2. Amancio Ortega: Spanish founder of Inditex which owns the Zara fashion chain (net worth $67 billion)

3. Warren Buffett: American CEO and largest shareholder in Berkshire Hathaway (net worth $60.8 billion)

4. Carlos Slim Helu: Mexican owner of Grupo Carso (net worth: $50 billion)

5. Jeff Bezos: American founder, chairman and chief executive of Amazon (net worth: $45.2 billion)

6. Mark Zuckerberg: American chairman, chief executive officer, and co-founder of Facebook (net worth $44.6 billion)

7. Larry Ellison: American co-founder and CEO of Oracle  (net worth $43.6 billion)

8. Michael Bloomberg: American founder, owner and CEO of Bloomberg LP (net worth: $40 billion)

Oxfam’s calculations are based on global wealth distribution data provided by the Credit Suisse Global 



Alien 3. Image via Blumhouse



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