Thursday, May 19, 2016

Retired priest: ‘Hell’ was invented by the church to control people with fear


This video is of an interview retired Episcopal bishop John Shelby Spong did with Keith Morrison of Dateline NBC back in August of 2006.
A partial transcript of the interview can be found beneath the video link:


Spong: I don’t think Hell exists. I happen to believe in life after death, but I don’t think it’s got a thing to do with reward and punishment. Religion is always in the control business, and that’s something people don’t really understand. It’s in a guilt-producing control business. And if you have Heaven as a place where you’re rewarded for you goodness, and Hell is a place where you’re punished for your evil, then you sort of have control of the population. And so they create this fiery place which has quite literally scared the Hell out of a lot of people, throughout Christian history. And it’s part of a control tactic.
Morrison: But wait a minute. You’re saying that Hell, the idea of a place under the earth or somewhere you’re tormented for an eternity – is actually an invention of the church?
Spong: I think the church fired its furnaces hotter than anybody else. But I think there’s a sense in most religious life of reward and punishment in some form. The church doesn’t like for people to grow up, because you can’t control grown-ups. That’s why we talk about being born again. When you’re born again, you’re still a child. People don’t need to be born again. They need to grow up. They need to accept their responsibility for themselves and the world.
Morrison: What do you make of the theology which is pretty quite prominent these days in America, which is there is one guaranteed way not to go to hell; and that is to accept Jesus as your personal savior.
Spong: Yeah, I grew up in that tradition. Every church I know claims that ‘we are the true church’ – that they have some ultimate authority, ‘We have the infallible Pope,’ ‘We have the Bible.’… The idea that the truth of God can be bound in any human system, by any human creed, by any human book, is almost beyond imagination for me.
I mean, God is not a Christian. God is not a Jew or a Muslim or a Hindi or Buddhist. All of those are human systems, which human beings have created to try to help us walk into the mystery of God. I honor my tradition. I walk through my tradition. But I don’t think my tradition defines God. It only points me to God.
By Koba | 2 July 2015
Urban Intellectuals

6 comments:

  1. This is an example of the emergence of Humanianity within our species. It is the shifting of our ethics from authoritarian ethics (obedience to the most powerful) to rational ethics that is legitimized by the Humanian ultimate ethical principle. This is explain in detail, with the presentation of a new tool to aid in this emergence, at humanianity.com. (No cost. no ads.)

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  2. I disagree, but not in the way people would expect.

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    Replies
    1. With what way do you disagree, and how?

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  3. Since my last post, above, I have done major work on that website, humanianity.com, clarifying the importance of improving religion rather than "stamping it out." Having a more realistic and appropriate concept of "religion" is I think extremely important. I would be interested in your responses. Perhaps a good place to start would be at https://humanianity.com/humanianity/humhome.php?_menu=2#d13

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